ON THE SHELF SPECIAL EDITION
I haven’t done one of these in quite a while but since I’ve acquired a number of books and GNs over the past couple of months, I thought I’d take a look at four books:

First on the list is Intersections, by Sean Phillips and Duncan Fegredo, published by Image Comics. A sketchbook project in both hardback and softcover, Intersections features art by Duncan and then Sean, alternating throughout the book. You get around 90 pages displaying Duncan and Sean’s unique sensibilities as they try to follow on from each other’s pieces. Both of them are accomplished and talented creators and this project just drives this home. It shows that they share some of the same preoccupations in their work (zombies, women, themselves) but they are also very different artists. Intersections reflects Fegredo and Phlllips’ mindset very likeably and the lack of text here is refreshing, allowing the pieces to speak for themselves. This pair are without question amongst the most bold and distinctive British comic artists of the past decade and Intersections shows off their versatility to good effect…

Next we have Silverfish, an original hardcover GN by David Lapham, published by Vertigo/ DC Comics. Lapham is an exceptional contemporary comic creator and his Murder Me Dead was a great slice of modern noir. Silverfish is the first book he’s done for Vertigo and it shows off his mordant sensibilities to good effect. In a hardcover format similar to The Originals, Silverfish deals with a girl, Mia Fleming, who discovers that her stepmother hides a dark and murderous secret. Although the conclusion is a little muddled and outlandish, Silverfish is worth the price of admission with Lapham creating a convincing familial relationship…

Waterloo Sunset
, by Andrew Stephenson and Trevor Goring, was published by Image as four squarebound issues a couple of years ago and it’s now available in a single volume. Goring is an ex-pat Brit who has lived in the States for years and has made quite a name for himself as a storyboard artist on big Hollywood movies while Stephenson has been on the fringes of prose sci-fi for a number of years. The series, whose concept is an intriguing one (what if London was separated from the rest of the world in a huge disaster?), throws up some interesting ideas but suffers from too much exposition, character dialect that is sometimes hard to understand and an ending that is unclear. Goring’s art is graphic and dynamic but Stephenson finds it hard to keep up and Waterloo Sunset collapses under the weight of its ambitions. So it’s a brave effort but it could have done with being a little longer in its page count, giving the story more room to breathe. It’s still worth picking up…

Finally, 100 Bullets: Once Upon A Crime, by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, Vertigo/ DC Comics, is the eleventh collection of Vertigo’s magnificent crime series. In this volume, we find out about Shepherd’s past and witness the continuing machinations of Graves and The Trust. Risso still draws the sexiest, most dangerous women in comics and Azzarello still delivers the goods even seven years after the series started.100 Bullets needs to be consumed in the trade paperback format as its impact is lessened in monthly installlments. Dave Johnson’s covers work as effective chapter breaks here too. Azzarello has set the bar very high for the conclusion of this series and I’m hoping he doesn’t disappoint…

www.vertigocomics.com
www.imagecomics.com
www.seanphillips.co.uk
www.fegredo.com